Tag Archives: Psalms

Psalms 96 – King James Version

Psalm 96

 O sing unto the LORD a new song: sing unto the LORD, all the earth.
 Sing unto the LORD, bless his name; shew forth his salvation from day to day.
 Declare his glory among the heathen, his wonders among all people.
 For the LORD is great, and greatly to be praised: he is to be feared above all gods.
 For all the gods of the nations are idols: but the LORD made the heavens.
 Honour and majesty are before him: strength and beauty are in his sanctuary.
 Give unto the LORD, O ye kindreds of the people, give unto the LORD glory and strength.
 Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name: bring an offering, and come into his courts.
 O worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness: fear before him, all the earth.
 Say among the heathen that the LORD reigneth: the world also shall be established that it shall not be moved: he shall judge the people righteously.
 Let the heavens rejoice, and let the earth be glad; let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof.
 Let the field be joyful, and all that is therein: then shall all the trees of the wood rejoice
 Before the LORD: for he cometh, for he cometh to judge the earth: he shall judge the world with righteousness, and the people with his truth.

From “Day-By-Day By Grace” by Bob Hoekstra

Sometimes we need a reminder, and other times we need to ask ourselves a question…

 

Living According to God’s Word

You have dealt well with Your servant, O LORD, according to Your word. (Psa_119:65)

David was a man who basically lived by grace (that is, by depending on the Lord to work in his life). Consequently, he trusted in the word of God (“the word of His grace” — Act_20:32). David lived according to God’s word. Psalm 119 bears substantial testimony of what can happen when one lives in this manner. “You have dealt well with Your servant, O LORD, according to Your word.” This strategic phrase (“according to Your word” ) has two implications: living in line with God’s word and living by the provisions of God’s word.

Therefore, those who live according to God’s word not only find their direction in the Scriptures, they find resource there as well. Many fruitful and respected Bible teachers (like C. H. Spurgeon) are convinced that David was the human instrumental author of Psalm 119. Whether this is true or not is incidental to our present meditation. In this majestic Psalm, the Holy Spirit (the ultimate author) depicts the all-inclusive nature of living according to the word.

Every person on earth begins their life with a sin problem (guilty, condemned, alienated from God). If a person wants to have their life cleaned up spiritually, they can see that accomplished according to God’s Word. “How can a young man cleanse his way? By taking heed according to Your word” (Psa_119:9). Anyone who will pay close attention to the message of the scriptures will find therein God’s provision of forgiveness and salvation. “Let Your mercies come also to me, O LORD — Your salvation according to Your word” (Psa_119:41). God’s merciful salvation (from sin and unto godliness) is enjoyed by those who call upon Him wholeheartedly. “I entreated Your favor with my whole heart; Be merciful to me according to Your word” (Psa_119:58).

Every person who has found new life through the Lord’s merciful salvation eventually encounters times when a reviving is needed. The difficulties of life seem to choke all spiritual vitality out of us. It is time to call upon the Lord and turn to His word. “I am afflicted very much; Revive me, O LORD, according to Your word” (Psa_119:107). Sometimes, the battle is so intense that our inner man seems to be smashed face down in the dirt. Again, it is time to seek the Lord in His word. “My soul clings to the dust; Revive me according to Your word” (Psa_119:25). Yes, in God’s word, we find direction for our lives and replenishing of our lives.

Dear Lord of the scriptures, I praise You for giving me new life according to Your word. Now, in the afflictions and battles that I face, I ask You to revive me according to Your word.

From “Morning and Evening” by C. H. Spurgeon

“The sweet psalmist of Israel.”
– 2Sa_23:1

Among all the saints whose lives are recorded in Holy Writ, David possesses an experience of the most striking, varied, and instructive character. In his history we meet with trials and temptations not to be discovered, as a whole, in other saints of ancient times, and hence he is all the more suggestive a type of our Lord. David knew the trials of all ranks and conditions of men. Kings have their troubles, and David wore a crown: the peasant has his cares, and David handled a shepherd’s crook: the wanderer has many hardships, and David abode in the caves of Engedi: the captain has his difficulties, and David found the sons of Zeruiah too hard for him. The psalmist was also tried in his friends, his counsellor Ahithophel forsook him, “He that eateth bread with me, hath lifted up his heel against me.” His worst foes were they of his own household: his children were his greatest affliction. The temptations of poverty and wealth, of honour and reproach, of health and weakness, all tried their power upon him. He had temptations from without to disturb his peace, and from within to mar his joy. David no sooner escaped from one trial than he fell into another; no sooner emerged from one season of despondency and alarm, than he was again brought into the lowest depths, and all God’s waves and billows rolled over him. It is probably from this cause that David’s psalms are so universally the delight of experienced Christians. Whatever our frame of mind, whether ecstasy or depression, David has exactly described our emotions. He was an able master of the human heart, because he had been tutored in the best of all schools-the school of heart-felt, personal experience. As we are instructed in the same school, as we grow matured in grace and in years, we increasingly appreciate David’s psalms, and find them to be “green pastures.” My soul, let David’s experience cheer and counsel thee this day.