Tag Archives: Willingness

From “Day-by-Day By Grace” by Bob Hoekstra

Jesus, the Ultimate Example of Humility

Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a servant, and coming in the likeness of men. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross. (Phi_2:5-8)
In order to live daily by the grace of God, we must be willing to walk in humility. “God . . . gives grace to the humble” (1Pe_5:5). The word of God offers extensive teaching concerning a life of humility. Moreover, in all of the scriptures we will find no greater insight than that which pertains to Jesus, the ultimate example of humility.

Before He came to earth as a man, Jesus had existed throughout eternity past as deity, the eternal Son of God. “Bethlehem . . . out of you shall come forth to Me the One to be ruler in Israel, whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting” (Micah 5:2). Since He was God, claiming deity was not an inappropriate intrusion into another’s domain: “who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God.” Although He would of necessity exist endlessly as God (even during His pilgrimage as a man), He did not go about independently exercising His Godhood: “but made Himself of no reputation.” Instead of manifesting all of His innate glory, He functioned as any human slave would: “taking the form of a servant, and coming in the likeness of men.” During His earthly ministry, He Himself would emphasize His servanthood role. “The Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many” (Mat_20:28).

In His majestic salvation mission, Jesus, the Son of God, would voluntarily accept the path of humility. “He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross.” This humility involved a yielding to the Father that was so extensive He would even embrace the most abhorrent death of all, a sin-atoning crucifixion. In spiritual agony, He would pray, “O My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; nevertheless, not as I will, but as You will” (Mat_26:39). This humble surrender to the Father’s will is the path that our Lord calls us to walk. “Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus.”

Dear heavenly Father, my heart is humbled as I consider the humbling You accepted in coming to this sinful planet. As God, You deserved all honor and glory. Yet, in order to please the Father and to save sinners,You were willing to become a lowly, human servant. Unlike Your example, I am easily tempted to resist humility, even though I deserve to be totally humiliated. Lord, please work in me a humble heart like You, in Your holy name, Amen.

From “Rylisms” by James Ryle

You have to…. 

Take a Risk

“Men who hazarded their lives for the name of the Lord Jesus.” (Acts 15:26)

 
The status quo requires no risk. Nothing ventured; nothing gained. But excellence, by its very nature, requires that you break out of the pack and pull away from the common and ordinary, shaking off the mundane and mediocre. Hey, the only thing in the middle of the road is yellow stripes and dead armadillos!

 
It has be said many times, “If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll always get what you’ve always got.” What this means, then, is if you want something that you’ve never had before, you must be willing to do something that you’ve never done before. And that is where RISK comes into the equation.

 
Noah built a boat in the middle of a desert —that was a risk. Abraham left his home and went out, not knowing where he was going – that was a risk. Moses forsook the security of Pharaoh’s palace, choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God —that was a risk.

 
Daniel prayed to God though the king had decreed death to any who dared do so—that was a risk. David faced a giant in the open field of battle—that was a risk. John the Baptist confronted the sins of King Herod—that was a risk. Peter walked on water—that was a risk. Paul openly declared to Caesar himself that Jesus Christ is Lord—that was a risk.

 
These were men of whom the world was not worthy. These are the fathers of our Faith, and we are their sons and daughters. Now it is our turn. Now we have the opportunity and the abilities to not only follow in their steps, but to go beyond where they themselves were able to go. But it will require a definite dose of vision, passion, discipline and risk.

 
Are you willing to make that leap?

 

 

From “The Word For You Today” by Bruce Christian

COMMITMENT AND COURAGE

Terry Fox ran across Canada and raised twenty-four million dollars to fight cancer.  What’s amazing is that he did it with one leg; cancer had taken the other.  He planned to run twenty-six miles each day but because of severe headaches, snow and icy roads, after a month he’d only managed to struggle about eight miles a day.  So why did he keep going?  Because the purpose in his heart was stronger than the pain in his body.  They could amputate his leg, but not his spirit!  Commitment is a willingness to do whatever it takes; it’s a promise to yourself, from which you refuse to back down.  There’s a difference between interest and commitment.  When you’re interested you do it only when it’s convenient, but when you’re committed you accept no excuses-only results.  Only you can decide whether the rewards are worth the efforts, for there are tradeoffs.  You can’t have a healthy body and live on junk food.  A guaranteed salary is nonexistent when you start your own business.  Mindless hours of watching television and straight “A’s” are a rare combination.  Commitment means paying your dues.  It also means disregarding your critics.  Jesus did that.  “But Jesus ignored their comments and said…’Don’t be afraid.  Just trust me.” (Mk 5:36 TLB).  Ralph Waldo Emerson said: “Whatever course you decide upon, there will always be someone to tell you that you are wrong.  There are always difficulties arising which tempt you to believe that your critics are right.  To map out a course of action and follow it to an end requires courage.”